Warden Park Primary Academy, New England Road, Haywards Heath, West Sussex RH16 3JR

01444 451264

Warden Park Primary

'Reach for the Stars'

Pupil Premium

Warden Park Primary Academy Pupil Premium Summary

What is the Pupil Premium?

The National Picture
The Pupil Premium was introduced by the Government in April 2011. It was designed to give additional money to support schools in raising the attainment of children who receive free school meals, children whose parents serve in the Armed Forces and those children in local authority care. These groups of children have been identified nationally as achieving at a lower level than children from less disadvantaged backgrounds. For example, national figures show that 11 year olds who are eligible for Free School Meals are around twice as likely not to achieve the expected standard in maths and English as other 11 year olds.

Where does the money come from?
Pupil Premium is allocated to schools based on the number of children who are currently known to be eligible for Free School Meals, whose parents serve in the Armed Forces and children who are looked after in local authority care.

The purpose of the Pupil Premium is to help schools to provide targeted support for vulnerable children- not necessarily just children who qualify for FSM.

“It is for schools to decide how the Pupil Premium, allocated to schools…. is spent, since they are best placed to assess what additional provision should be made for the individual pupils within their responsibility.” (Source – DfE website)

The funding is therefore given to schools to spend as they think best, although there is a requirement to publish online how this money is spent.

For more details on the Pupil Premium please visit:
http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/pupilsupport/premium

 

 Pupil Premium at Warden Park Primary Academy

At Warden Park Primary Academy we are committed to ensuring all our children make the best possible progress. We track the achievement of every child on a regular basis and do all we can to make sure each child achieves their potential. We also have a duty to ensure that no group of children are disadvantaged due to their gender, ethnic origin, family income or background. Through creating a deep and complex well resourced, high quality learning environment and through valuing ‘Parents as Partners’, we continually strive to actively promote the progress of all our pupils regardless of gender, ethnic origin, family income or background.

We are well staffed at Warden Park Primary Academy and children in all year groups learn in classes where the staff team includes a teacher and support staff. Children are familiar with working in groups of different sizes, at different times of the day, with different adults. Children of all abilities have the opportunity to work on a 1:1 basis or in a small group with an adult. Within this type of organisation, we do give children extra support when they need it.

The Pupil Premium funding has allowed us to continue and extend what we already do – to monitor children’s progress and to give additional support when required. Children are certainly not singled out or stigmatised for getting some extra attention and we would never label a child in front of other children for receiving free school meals or being in care.

 OBJECTIVES FOR PUPIL PREMIUM IN THIS SCHOOL

• The Pupil Premium will be used to provide additional educational support to improve the progress and to raise the standard of achievement for these pupils.

• The funding will be used to narrow and close the gap between the achievement of these pupils and their peers.

• As far as its powers allow the school will use the additional funding to address any underlying inequalities between children eligible for Pupil Premium and others.

• We will ensure that the additional funding reaches the pupils who need it most and that it makes a significant impact on their education and lives.

Pupil Premium Strategy – Warden Park Primary Academy 2019-20

A tiered approach to Pupil Premium Spending

The Education Endowment Foundation asserts that considering a tiered approach to Pupil Premium spending can help schools balance approaches to improving teaching, targeted academic support and wider strategies:

1 Teaching

Spending on improving teaching might include professional development, training and support for early career teachers and recruitment and retention. Ensuring an effective teacher is in front of every class, and that every teacher is supported to keep improving, is the key ingredient of a successful school and should rightly be the top priority for Pupil Premium spending.

2 Targeted academic support

Evidence consistently shows the positive impact that targeted academic support can have, including on those who are not making good progress across the spectrum of achievement. Considering how classroom teachers and teaching assistants can provide targeted academic support, including how to link structured one-to-one or small group intervention to classroom teaching, is likely to be a key component of an effective PupilPremium strategy.

3 Wider strategies

Wider strategies relate to the most significant non-academic barriers to success in school, including attendance, behaviour and social and emotional support. While many barriers may be common between schools, it is also likely that the specific features of the community each school serves will affect spending in this category.

Warden Park Primary Academy’s approach to Pupil Premium spending is in line with this approach.  

The WPPA development plan is focused on tier 1 (teaching) and is driven by the following priorities in 2019/20:

  1. To routinely challenge pupils across the curriculum so that more achieve the higher standards
  2. To embed excellent assessment for learning practice (the Big Five)
  3. To improve the quality of teaching and learning of English
  4. To Ensure that inclusive practice across the school further meets the learning and SEMH needs of all children
  5. To further engage parents in their children’s learning

 

 

This following strategy document details our approach to tiers 2 (academic support) and 3 (targeted and wider strategies).



1.   Summary information

School

Warden Park Primary Academy - Three Year Objectives

Academic Year

2019/20

Total PP budget

£139,880

Date of most recent PP Review

November 2019

Total number of pupils

433

(including Nursery)

Number of pupils eligible for PP 

103 (24%)

Date for next internal review of this strategy

November 2020

 

2.   Barriers to future attainment (for pupils eligible for PP, including high ability)

In-school barriers (issues to be addressed in school, such as poor oral language skills)

A.    

PP children have low prior attainment, either at the start of EYFS or whenever they joined the school in later year groups.

B.    

PP children do not make expected progress from their starting points. Pupils eligible for PP do not make sufficient progress in the key skills of the core curriculum.

C.

Social, emotional and behavioural problems affecting wellbeing and progress. Many of the PP children lack the resilience of their peers.

D.

Co-existing Special Education Needs

External barriers (issues which also require action outside school, such as low attendance rates)

E.

Pupil attendance is weaker for PP eligible pupils compared to non-Pupil Premium children.

F.

Home environment and/or lack of routine means that PP children arrive less prepared for learning e.g. incomplete home learning, missing uniform, disrupted evening / morning routine, emotional difficulties

3.   Desired outcomes

 

Desired outcomes and how they will be measured

Success criteria

A.     

To narrow the gap for the children who start school behind age related expectations.

The gap is narrowed between their outcomes and chronological age.

Greater % of PP children attain a GLD at end of EYFS.

Impact of Nursery provision on attainment on entry to Reception classes and ‘school readiness’.

B.     

To close the gap so that PP children reach age related expectations. 

Increase in the number of PP children reaching the expected standard

C.     

PP children are more resilient and as a result are able to achieve as well as their peers.

PP children require less PSM intervention due to improved learning behaviour, in turn leading to improved outcomes. 

D.      

Targeted interventions have greater impact on the progress of PP who also have SEND.

PP/SEN children make expected progress as  a result of intervention therefore closing the gap between current attainment and age related expectations.

E.      

To reduce the gap between PP and Non-PP attendance rates.  

Reduce the number of persistent absentees amongst pupils eligible for PP. Improve the attendance rates so that pupils’ attendance rates are in line with other pupils.

F.     

PP children arrive at school ready to learn and supported in completing home learning.

Children are more ready to learn as a result of the support in place for families.

 

4.   Planned expenditure

Academic year

2019/20

How will Pupil Premium be spent in 2019/20?

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

Success Criteria

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

A.    

To narrow the gap for the children who start school behind age related expectations.

 

On entry all PP have low attainment – a minimum of 6 months behind age related expectations and a maximum of 18 months behind.

Early Years to support low-attainers through additional allocation of adult support to achieve Success Criteria.  


Developing the EY’s unit. This involves mixing children for phonics (stage not age learning) and having a whole unit independent learning time daily.


Nursery:

High adult to child ratio; staff are highly qualified and we have a specific SEN TA

Specific adult support for children focusing on Communication and Language and PSED.

Use of a sensory room.

Sending home story bags.


Reception:

School Start intervention programme to be used for those with low attainment on entry. Also a social interaction group to help with language and confidence and an understanding group which focuses on following instructions.

Weekly 1:1 reading with either the class teacher or class TA’s.

1:1 Reading and Writing afternoon interventions

 

Budget: £12,000

The gap is narrowed between their outcomes and chronological age.

Greater % of PP children attain a GLD at end of EYFS. 


Increased recognition of letters and sounds.

Phonics assessment information these children


Closing the gap for PP children in PSED and CL; ensuring they are working at age-expected levels where possible.


Easier reception transition,

‘School ready’ learning behaviour.


Increased independence to access learning opportunities. 


Increased ability to share and cope within a class setting.

  



Emma Phillips

EYFS Lead

 

 

Progress Meetings with EYFS to assess the impact of actions on pupil progress and attainment – half termly.


Raising profile of PP children in EY’s meetings (twice a month)

B.

To close the attainment gap so that a greater porportion of disadvantaged children reach age related expectations.

Close the gap through targeted interventions so that children are able to meet the expected standard for their year group.


Ongoing TA training to ensure all staff are able to provide ‘Close the Gap’ interventions. 

 

Training teachers in formative assessment ( Shirley Clarke) to improve teacher knowledge of children’s attainment; plan effectively to meet the needs of all and to provide effective feedback to help PP children make more progress.


Zones of Regulation training at all levels to ensure all staff expect the highest outcomes for all pupils.


Progress meetings explicitly discuss the impact of interventions and feedback on PP progress. Challenging targets set to help close the gap in attainment.


Staff individualised support and training (PDP) to improve the quality of teaching to ensure impact on PP children.

 

Additional TAs in class every afternoon -  £50,820

Staff training for TAs - £1,900

SLT to provide PDP support for teachers - £6,000

 

Budget: £58,820

Increase in the number of PP children reaching the expected standard.

 

See Arbor attainment and progress data. 

KS1 AHT – Katie Forster

KS2 AHT – Hannah Dodd

 

DHT

Liz Conneely

 

Half termly progress meetings focus on the impact of teaching and directed interventions on PP children.

C

Disadvantaged children become more resilient and as a result are able to achieve as well as their peers.

 

Welfare and social needs are met through support from additional adults in school and the school Pastoral Support Team. 


Targeted Pastoral Support Interventions based on nurture, self esteem and resilience building support individual children and families.

 

Working directly with families through the Early Help process to support learning at home, behaviour and attendance.


Behavioural support through the Pastoral Support Team,  providing 1:1 nurture/emotional support to remove barriers to learning, enabling children to  access and complete learning and remain in class


Zones of Regulation interventions (TAs and SEN TAs) to support self regulation and behaviour for learning.


Free lunchtime and after school clubs available to PP children  to broaden experiences, develop social skills and team work. Priority given to PP pupils.


Budget: £17,000

PP children require less PSM intervention due to improved learning behaviour, in turn leading to improved outcomes. 


Children and families welfare needs are supported and met so that children are able to learn and fully engage in school life.

 

Children are able to access additional dedicated pastoral support in school at all times.


Children develop the skills to self regulate and manage their own behaviour.

Inclusion  AB


Pastoral Support 

AP and SL


Early Help/

safeguarding GD 



Jan 2020, termly thereafter



D. 

Targeted interventions have greater impact on the progress of disadvantaged pupils who also have SEND.

 

To accelerate the progress and close the gap in attainment for pupils eligible for PP with a particular focus on SEND/PP pupils by employing additional adult support. 


Pupils are supported during whole class and group learning to reach their attainment targets.


Pupils undertake intensive targeted interventions to close enable them to meet their attainment targets, and to enable more children to meet ARE. Interventions may be 1:1 or small group and are carried out by class TAs who know the learning needs of the children.


Pupils with high SEN needs take part in targeted interventions to support specific needs eg Memory, Speech and Language, vocabulary development. 


Rationale: Education Endowment Foundation (June 2016):

One to One tuition: evidence indicates that 1:1 tuition can be effective, on average accelerating learning by approximately 5 additional months progress. Short, regular sessions set over a set period of time appear to result in optimum impact.

Small group tuition: Intensive tuition in small groups if often provided to support lower attaining learners or those who are falling behind. Evidence indicates that small group tuition can accelerate learning by 4+ months.

 

Ensure  appropriate SMART targets are set for identified SEND children and that these are closely monitored, through Individual Learning Plans. 

SLT Speech and Language Therapist (Emily Folan) asesses and monitors the speech and language needs of individual children, ensuring that these are identified and supported as early as possible to maximise progress and remove the barriers to learning. Targets are set by the speech therapist and delivered by TAs and SENTAs. 


SLT Speech and Language Therapist runs training for Academy staff (Teachers and TAs) and workshops for parents, enabling class based staff to effectively support speech and language needs at Wave 1, and parents to understand and support developing language at home. 


We will continue to track and monitor data of PP children and exit data  for intervention programmes.

   

Budget: £22,024

PP/SEN children make expected progress as a result of intervention therefore closing the gap between current attainment and age related expectations.

  

SENDCo - AB

January 2020, termly thereafter

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

Success Criteria

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

E. 

To reduce the gap between the attendance rates of disadvantaged and Non-disadvantaged pupils.  

Increase attendance rates for pupils eligible for Pupil Premium.


We will continue to track and monitor attendance data for PP children.


Red. Amber, Green Letters sent home to parents to inform them of current attendance and to challenge low attendance.


Attendance discussed at Parent and Teacher meetings and colour coded on forms to check for improvement. 


Follow-up meetings with families and Deputy Head about attendance where there is no improvement.


County procedures will be followed for persistent absence and Pastoral Support Team involved to support our PP children.

TAF meetings - attendance concerns are raised.

Reduce the number of persistent absentees amongst pupils eligible for PP. Improve the attendance rates so that pupils’ attendance rates are in line with other pupils.

Deputy Head

EB

Jan 2020, termly thereafter.

F. 

Disadvantaged children arrive at school ready to learn and supported in completing home learning.

Home environment and/or lack of routine means that PP children arrive less prepared for learning e.g. incomplete home learning, missing uniform, disrupted evening / morning routine, emotional difficulties. 

 

Breakfast provided for all pupils in class every morning to ensure no child starts the day hungry. Teachers monitor that PP children have eaten.


Member of staff employed to work on Early Help Plans 4 days a week to coordinate resources for families requiring additional support.


Pastoral Support Team employed to support children in settling into the school routine when arriving upset. Providing on-going support throughout the day.


Pastoral Support Team provide a variety of play and lunchtime support for children with social and emotional needs. 


Budget: £28,000

Children are more ready to learn as a result of the support in place for families.

Pastoral Support


EHP manager

DDSL manager

 

Jan 2020, termly thereafter.

Total budgeted cost

£137,844

 

 

Spending 2018-19

 

Sept 2018- August 2019

Total number of pupils on roll

362

Total Number of pupils eligible for PPG

100 (28%)

Amount if PPG received per pupil

£1,300 

Total amount of PPG received

£141.240

 

Rationale for pupil premium spending:

The Pupil Premium is designed to give additional money to support schools in raising the attainment of children who receive free school meals, children whose parents serve in the Armed Forces and those children in local authority care. These groups of children have been identified nationally as achieving at a lower level than children from less disadvantaged backgrounds. Our provision aims to address and close these attainment gaps.

Provision

To address the following barriers What was the impact?

 

Pupils entitled to pupil premium funding have been identified nationally as achieving at a lower level than children from less disadvantaged backgrounds. Our provision aims to address and close these attainment gaps.

 

Y1 Phonics Check

Whilst WPPA pupils achieve as well as other similar pupils nationally, there was still a gap  compared to all other pupils nationally.

KS1 (Y2) attainment and progress

The gap between disadvantaged pupils and their peers at WPPA in 2018 continued to reduce and was in line with the national picture. Also,  disadvantaged pupils did better than other disadvantaged pupils nationally, there was still a gap to close.

KS2 attainment and progress

In 2017 disadvantaged pupils did better than other similar pupils nationally in Reading, Writing and Maths combined and in Writing and Maths individually, they did less well in Reading.  Some disadvantaged middle attainers did not reach the expected standard, their scaled scores indicate their gap was small.  This gap needed to continue to close from 2018 onwards.

Through half termly progress meetings and termly pupil progress and attainment reports and on-going monitoring of teaching and learning:

Y1 Phonics

  • In terms of the teaching of phonics, pupils are well prepared for the next stage of their education.
  • A very large majority of pupils in Year 1 achieve the expected standard in the national phonics check (88%).  The phonic attainment of disadvantaged learners in 2019 was in line with national data (67% compared to 71% nationally)  100% of disadvantaged pupils without special educational needs passed the phonics check.

Key Stage 1

  • In reading, writing and maths, the progress from different starting points of the very large majority of disadvantaged pupils is similar to or improving in relation to other pupils nationally.
  • In terms of RWM combined attainment, the progress of disadvantaged pupils is above average, as the gap between disadvantaged pupils and national other is smaller than the national gap.
  • The progress of disadvantaged pupils currently on roll is close to or is improving towards that of other pupils with the same starting points.

Key Stage 2

  • The school gap in attainment and progress in Reading, Writing and Maths has narrowed significantly since 2017.

Additional support staff:

2 additional teaching assistants across the 2 EY classes

Teaching assistant support in all KS2 classes in the afternoons to facilitate:

 

  • Pre-teaching concepts prior to the main lesson.
  • Addressing misconceptions in a timely fashion prior to the lesson.
  • Reading, writing and maths interventions delivered to clearly identified small groups of children, either by Intervention Teacher or teaching assistants 

 

 

Increased level of staff to support the most vulnerable learners and their families:

  • Inclusion Manager (Assistant Headteacher) - increased hours
  • Early Help Manager - increased hours
  • An additional pastoral support mentor
  • An additional 4 member of staff training as Designated Safeguarding Leads
Additional needs can result in pupils being unable to spend all of their learning time in class with their peers.
  • Children were more able to participate in class based learning for prolonged periods of time.  Interventions demonstrated impact on pupils' social and emotional development

Funding places at Residential and on enrichment courses, school visits.

Some families would find the financing of such opportunities unaffordable.
  • Children had structured opportunities to develop social and communication skills, in turn impacting on their learning skills and improved standards of work.

Funding places at breakfast for all vulnerable pupils

Children do not always have the opportunity to eat breakfast before school.
  • Children had structured opportunities to develop social and communication skills, arrive at school on time, enjoy a healthy breakfast, which in turn will impact on their learning skills and improved standards of work.

Provision of half price uniform

Some families find it difficult to afford school uniform, particularly where there is more than one child at WPPA.
  • Children were dressed as their peers and there was no discrimination.