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The Sussex Learning Trust aims to play an integral part in providing the highest possible educational opportunities for children and young people in Sussex via a network of Academies committed to partnership working for the benefit of pupils and students

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Pupil Premium

Warden Park Primary Academy Pupil Premium Summary

What is the Pupil Premium?

The National Picture
The Pupil Premium was introduced by the Government in April 2011. It was designed to give additional money to support schools in raising the attainment of children who receive free school meals, children whose parents serve in the Armed Forces and those children in local authority care. These groups of children have been identified nationally as achieving at a lower level than children from less disadvantaged backgrounds. For example, national figures show that 11 year olds who are eligible for Free School Meals are around twice as likely not to achieve the expected standard in maths and English as other 11 year olds.

Where does the money come from?
Pupil Premium is allocated to schools based on the number of children who are currently known to be eligible for Free School Meals, whose parents serve in the Armed Forces and children who are looked after in local authority care.

The purpose of the Pupil Premium is to help schools to provide targeted support for vulnerable children- not necessarily just children who qualify for FSM.

“It is for schools to decide how the Pupil Premium, allocated to schools…. is spent, since they are best placed to assess what additional provision should be made for the individual pupils within their responsibility.” (Source – DfE website)

The funding is therefore given to schools to spend as they think best, although there is a requirement to publish online how this money is spent.

For more details on the Pupil Premium please visit:
http://www.education.gov.uk/schools/pupilsupport/premium

 

 Pupil Premium at Warden Park Primary Academy

At Warden Park Primary Academy we are committed to ensuring all our children make the best possible progress. We track the achievement of every child on a regular basis and do all we can to make sure each child achieves their potential. We also have a duty to ensure that no group of children are disadvantaged due to their gender, ethnic origin, family income or background. Through creating a deep and complex well resourced, high quality learning environment and through valuing ‘Parents as Partners’, we continually strive to actively promote the progress of all our pupils regardless of gender, ethnic origin, family income or background.

We are well staffed at Warden Park Primary Academy and children in all year groups learn in classes where the staff team includes a teacher and support staff. Children are familiar with working in groups of different sizes, at different times of the day, with different adults. Children of all abilities have the opportunity to work on a 1:1 basis or in a small group with an adult. Within this type of organisation, we do give children extra support when they need it.

The Pupil Premium funding has allowed us to continue and extend what we already do – to monitor children’s progress and to give additional support when required. Children are certainly not singled out or stigmatised for getting some extra attention and we would never label a child in front of other children for receiving free school meals or being in care.

 OBJECTIVES FOR PUPIL PREMIUM IN THIS SCHOOL

• The Pupil Premium will be used to provide additional educational support to improve the progress and to raise the standard of achievement for these pupils.

• The funding will be used to narrow and close the gap between the achievement of these pupils and their peers.

• As far as its powers allow the school will use the additional funding to address any underlying inequalities between children eligible for Pupil Premium and others.

• We will ensure that the additional funding reaches the pupils who need it most and that it makes a significant impact on their education and lives.

 

Overview

 

Sept 2016- August 2017

Total number of pupils on roll

318

Total Number of pupils eligible for PPG

 84

Amount if PPG received per pupil

£1,300 (correct)

Total amount of PPG received

 £109,200

 

Spending 2016-17

Rationale for pupil premium spending:

The Pupil Premium is designed to give additional money to support schools in raising the attainment of children who receive free school meals, children whose parents serve in the Armed Forces and those children in local authority care. These groups of children have been identified nationally as achieving at a lower level than children from less disadvantaged backgrounds. Our provision aims to address and close these attainment gaps.

Provision

To address the following barriers How will the impact be measured?

Key Stage 2 class organisation

Six single age classes rather than five mixed-age classes 

 Pupils entitled to pupil premium funding have been identified nationally as achieving at a lower level than children from less disadvantaged backgrounds. Our provision aims to address and close these attainment gaps.

 

Y1 Phonics Check

Whilst WPPA pupils achieve as well as other similar pupils nationally, there is still a gap of 12% compared to all other pupils nationally.

 KS1 attainment and progress

Whilst the disadvantaged gap at WPPA is reducing (2014 - 51%, 2015 - 19%, 2016 - 14% ) and is currently in line with the national picture  and the fact that disadvantaged pupils do better than other disadvantaged pupils nationally, there is still a gap to close.

KS2 attainment and progress

Whilst disadvantaged pupils do better than other similar pupils nationally in reading and maths, they do less well in writing.


Where disadvantaged middle attainers did not reach the expected standard, their scaled scores indicate their gap was small.  This gap needs to close in 2017.

Through half termly progress meetings and termly pupil progress and attainment reports and on-going monitoring of teaching and learning:

Key Stage 1

  • In reading, writing and maths, the progress from different starting points of the very large majority of disadvantaged pupils will continue to improve in relation to other pupils nationally.
  • In terms of RWM combined attainment. the progress of disadvantaged pupils will continue to be above average, as the gap between disadvantaged pupils at WPPA and national other  will be smaller than the national gap
  • In terms of attainment in the phonics check, the progress from different starting points of the very large majority of disadvantaged pupils will continue to improve in relation to other pupils nationally.

Key Stage 2

  • In reading and maths, the progress from different starting points of the very large majority of disadvantaged pupils is better than other pupils nationally.
  • Pupil progress in writing will significantly improve.

Additional support staff:

2 additional teaching assistants across the 2 EY classes

Additional teaching assistant support in KS2 in the afternoons to facilitate:

 

  • Pre-teaching concepts prior to the main lesson.
  • Addressing misconceptions in a timely fashion prior to the lesson.
  • Reading, writing and maths interventions delivered to clearly identified small groups of children, either by Intervention Teacher or teaching assistants 

 

 

Access to increased pastoral support through the development of an increased pastoral support team (one additional member of staff).

Additional needs can result in pupils being unable to spend all of their learning time in class with their peers.
  • Children are more able to participate in class based learning for prolonged periods of time.  Interventions demonstrated impact on pupils' social emotional development.
  • A reduction in the amount of internal exclusions.
  • An improvement in pupil well being.

Funding places at Residential and on enrichment courses, school visits.

Some families would find the financing of such opportunities unaffordable.
  • Children will have structured opportunities to develop social and communication skills, in turn impacting on their learning skills and improved standards of work.

Funding places at breakfast for all vulnerable pupils

Children do not always have the opportunity to eat breakfast before school.
  • Children will have structured opportunities to develop social and communication skills, arrive at school on time, enjoy a healthy breakfast, which in turn will impact on their learning skills and improved standards of work.

Provision of half price uniform

Some families find it difficult to afford school uniform, particularly where there is more than one child at WPPA.
  • Children will be dressed as their peers and there will be no discrimination.

 

The next review of our pupil premium strategy will be in February 2017.

Summary of 2015-2016

This funding focused on the provision and implementation of individual and small group support in reading, writing and maths and the extension of first hand experiences in order to support, enhance and develop learning across the curriculum.

Provision

Impact

KS1 class organisation

Four single age classes (2 x Y1 and 2 x Y2) rather than three mixed-age classes (3 x Y1/2)

KS2 class organisation

Three single-age classes (Y5 and 2 x Y6) rather than two mixed age classes (2 x Y5/6)

 

Additional support staff:

5 teaching assistants across the 2 EY classes

3 teaching assistants across the 2 Y1 classes

3 teaching assistants across the 2 Y2 classes

Additional teaching assistant support in KS2 in the afternoons to facilitate:

Pre-teaching concepts prior to the main lesson.

Addressing misconceptions in a timely fashion prior to the lesson.

Reading, writing and maths interventions delivered to clearly identified small groups of children, either by Intervention Teacher or teaching assistants 

Key Stage 1
  • In reading, writing and maths, the progress from different starting points of the very large majority of disadvantaged pupils is similar to or improving in relation to other pupils nationally.
  • In terms of RWM combined attainment. the progress of disadvantaged pupils is above average, as the gap between disadvantaged pupils and national other (10% - 50%/60%) is smaller than the national gap (14% - 44%/60%).
  • The progress of disadvantaged pupils  currently on roll is close to or is improving towards that of other pupils with the same starting points.

Key Stage 2

  • In reading and maths, the progress from different starting points of the very large majority of disadvantaged pupils is better than other pupils nationally.

 

 

Addressing misconceptions in a timely fashion prior to the lesson.

Phonics intervention delivered to clearly identified small groups of children

  • In terms of the teaching of phonics, pupils are well prepared for the next stage of their education.
  • A very large majority of pupils in Year 1 achieve the expected standard in the national phonics check.

Access to increased Learning Mentor time  through the development of an increased pastoral support team (one additional member of staff).

  • Children were more able to participate in class based learning for prolonged periods of time.  Interventions demonstrated impact on pupils' social emotional development

Funding places at Residential and on enrichment courses, school visits.

 

  • Children had structured opportunities to develop social and communication skills, in turn impacting on their learning skills and improved standards of work.

Funding places at breakfast for all vulnerable pupils

 

  • Children had structured opportunities to develop social and communication skills, arrive at school on time, enjoy a healthy breakfast, which in turn will impact on their learning skills and improved standards of work.

Provision of half price uniform

  • Children were dressed as their peers and there was no discrimination.